Guide to the Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

with profile DRAFT - ANSSI DAT-NT28 (minimal)
Draft profile for ANSSI compliance at the minimal level. ANSSI stands for Agence nationale de la sécurité des systèmes d'information. Based on https://www.ssi.gouv.fr/.
This guide presents a catalog of security-relevant configuration settings for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. It is a rendering of content structured in the eXtensible Configuration Checklist Description Format (XCCDF) in order to support security automation. The SCAP content is is available in the scap-security-guide package which is developed at https://www.open-scap.org/security-policies/scap-security-guide.

Providing system administrators with such guidance informs them how to securely configure systems under their control in a variety of network roles. Policy makers and baseline creators can use this catalog of settings, with its associated references to higher-level security control catalogs, in order to assist them in security baseline creation. This guide is a catalog, not a checklist, and satisfaction of every item is not likely to be possible or sensible in many operational scenarios. However, the XCCDF format enables granular selection and adjustment of settings, and their association with OVAL and OCIL content provides an automated checking capability. Transformations of this document, and its associated automated checking content, are capable of providing baselines that meet a diverse set of policy objectives. Some example XCCDF Profiles, which are selections of items that form checklists and can be used as baselines, are available with this guide. They can be processed, in an automated fashion, with tools that support the Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP). The DISA STIG, which provides required settings for US Department of Defense systems, is one example of a baseline created from this guidance.
Do not attempt to implement any of the settings in this guide without first testing them in a non-operational environment. The creators of this guidance assume no responsibility whatsoever for its use by other parties, and makes no guarantees, expressed or implied, about its quality, reliability, or any other characteristic.

Profile Information

Profile TitleDRAFT - ANSSI DAT-NT28 (minimal)
Profile IDxccdf_org.ssgproject.content_profile_anssi_nt28_minimal

CPE Platforms

  • cpe:/o:redhat:enterprise_linux:7
  • cpe:/o:redhat:enterprise_linux:7::client
  • cpe:/o:redhat:enterprise_linux:7::computenode

Revision History

Current version: 0.1.45

  • draft (as of 2019-07-22)

Table of Contents

  1. Services
    1. Mail Server Software
    2. DHCP
    3. Deprecated services
  2. System Settings
    1. Installing and Maintaining Software
    2. Configure Syslog
    3. Account and Access Control

Checklist

Group   Guide to the Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7   Group contains 13 groups and 13 rules
Group   Services   Group contains 4 groups and 3 rules

[ref]   The best protection against vulnerable software is running less software. This section describes how to review the software which Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 installs on a system and disable software which is not needed. It then enumerates the software packages installed on a default Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 system and provides guidance about which ones can be safely disabled.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 provides a convenient minimal install option that essentially installs the bare necessities for a functional system. When building Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 systems, it is highly recommended to select the minimal packages and then build up the system from there.

Group   Mail Server Software   Group contains 1 rule

[ref]   Mail servers are used to send and receive email over the network. Mail is a very common service, and Mail Transfer Agents (MTAs) are obvious targets of network attack. Ensure that systems are not running MTAs unnecessarily, and configure needed MTAs as defensively as possible.

Very few systems at any site should be configured to directly receive email over the network. Users should instead use mail client programs to retrieve email from a central server that supports protocols such as IMAP or POP3. However, it is normal for most systems to be independently capable of sending email, for instance so that cron jobs can report output to an administrator. Most MTAs, including Postfix, support a submission-only mode in which mail can be sent from the local system to a central site MTA (or directly delivered to a local account), but the system still cannot receive mail directly over a network.

The alternatives program in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 permits selection of other mail server software (such as Sendmail), but Postfix is the default and is preferred. Postfix was coded with security in mind and can also be more effectively contained by SELinux as its modular design has resulted in separate processes performing specific actions. More information is available on its website, http://www.postfix.org.

Rule   Uninstall Sendmail Package   [ref]

Sendmail is not the default mail transfer agent and is not installed by default. The sendmail package can be removed with the following command:

$ sudo yum erase sendmail

Rationale:

The sendmail software was not developed with security in mind and its design prevents it from being effectively contained by SELinux. Postfix should be used instead.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80288-4

References:  NT28(R1), 11, 14, 3, 9, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS05.02, DSS05.05, DSS06.06, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 7.6, A.12.1.2, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, A.9.1.2, CM-7, PR.IP-1, PR.PT-3

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
# Function to remove packages on RHEL, Fedora, Debian, and possibly other systems.
#
# Example Call(s):
#
#     package_remove telnet-server
#
function package_remove {

# Load function arguments into local variables
local package="$1"

# Check sanity of the input
if [ $# -ne "1" ]
then
  echo "Usage: package_remove 'package_name'"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

if which dnf ; then
  if rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    dnf remove -y "$package"
  fi
elif which yum ; then
  if rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    yum remove -y "$package"
  fi
elif which apt-get ; then
  apt-get remove -y "$package"
else
  echo "Failed to detect available packaging system, tried dnf, yum and apt-get!"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

}

package_remove sendmail
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
- name: Ensure sendmail is removed
  package:
    name: sendmail
    state: absent
  when: ansible_virtualization_role != "guest" or ansible_virtualization_type != "docker"
  tags:
    - package_sendmail_removed
    - medium_severity
    - disable_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - low_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80288-4
    - NIST-800-53-CM-7
Remediation Puppet snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
include remove_sendmail

class remove_sendmail {
  package { 'sendmail':
    ensure => 'purged',
  }
}
Remediation Anaconda snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable

package --remove=sendmail
Group   DHCP   Group contains 1 group and 1 rule

[ref]   The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) allows systems to request and obtain an IP address and other configuration parameters from a server.

This guide recommends configuring networking on clients by manually editing the appropriate files under /etc/sysconfig. Use of DHCP can make client systems vulnerable to compromise by rogue DHCP servers, and should be avoided unless necessary. If using DHCP is necessary, however, there are best practices that should be followed to minimize security risk.

Group   Disable DHCP Server   Group contains 1 rule

[ref]   The DHCP server dhcpd is not installed or activated by default. If the software was installed and activated, but the system does not need to act as a DHCP server, it should be disabled and removed.

Rule   Uninstall DHCP Server Package   [ref]

If the system does not need to act as a DHCP server, the dhcp package can be uninstalled. The dhcp package can be removed with the following command:

$ sudo yum erase dhcp

Rationale:

Removing the DHCP server ensures that it cannot be easily or accidentally reactivated and disrupt network operation.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80331-2

References:  NT28(R1), 11, 14, 3, 9, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS05.02, DSS05.05, DSS06.06, CCI-000366, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 7.6, A.12.1.2, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, A.9.1.2, CM-7, PR.IP-1, PR.PT-3

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
# Function to remove packages on RHEL, Fedora, Debian, and possibly other systems.
#
# Example Call(s):
#
#     package_remove telnet-server
#
function package_remove {

# Load function arguments into local variables
local package="$1"

# Check sanity of the input
if [ $# -ne "1" ]
then
  echo "Usage: package_remove 'package_name'"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

if which dnf ; then
  if rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    dnf remove -y "$package"
  fi
elif which yum ; then
  if rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    yum remove -y "$package"
  fi
elif which apt-get ; then
  apt-get remove -y "$package"
else
  echo "Failed to detect available packaging system, tried dnf, yum and apt-get!"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

}

package_remove dhcp
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
- name: Ensure dhcp is removed
  package:
    name: dhcp
    state: absent
  tags:
    - package_dhcp_removed
    - medium_severity
    - disable_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - low_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80331-2
    - NIST-800-53-CM-7
Remediation Puppet snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable
include remove_dhcp

class remove_dhcp {
  package { 'dhcp':
    ensure => 'purged',
  }
}
Remediation Anaconda snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:disable

package --remove=dhcp
Group   Deprecated services   Group contains 1 rule

[ref]   Some deprecated software services impact the overall system security due to their behavior (leak of confidentiality in network exchange, usage as uncontrolled communication channel, risk associated with the service due to its old age, etc.

Rule   Uninstall the telnet server   [ref]

The telnet daemon should be uninstalled.

Rationale:

telnet allows clear text communications, and does not protect any data transmission between client and server. Any confidential data can be listened and no integrity checking is made.

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

References:  NT28(R1), 11, 12, 14, 15, 3, 8, 9, APO13.01, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS01.04, DSS05.02, DSS05.03, DSS05.05, DSS06.06, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.5.3, 4.3.3.5.4, 4.3.3.5.5, 4.3.3.5.6, 4.3.3.5.7, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.1, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.3, 4.3.3.7.4, 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.11, SR 1.12, SR 1.13, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.6, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, SR 2.2, SR 2.3, SR 2.4, SR 2.5, SR 2.6, SR 2.7, SR 3.1, SR 3.5, SR 3.8, SR 4.1, SR 4.3, SR 5.1, SR 5.2, SR 5.3, SR 7.1, SR 7.6, A.11.2.6, A.12.1.2, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.13.1.1, A.13.2.1, A.14.1.3, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, A.6.2.1, A.6.2.2, A.9.1.2, AC-17(8), CM-7, PR.AC-3, PR.IP-1, PR.PT-3, PR.PT-4

Group   System Settings   Group contains 7 groups and 10 rules

[ref]   Contains rules that check correct system settings.

Group   Installing and Maintaining Software   Group contains 2 groups and 7 rules

[ref]   The following sections contain information on security-relevant choices during the initial operating system installation process and the setup of software updates.

Group   Sudo   Group contains 2 rules

[ref]   Sudo, which stands for \"su 'do'\", provides the ability to delegate authority to certain users, groups of users, or system administrators. When configured for system users and/or groups, Sudo can allow a user or group to execute privileged commands that normally only root is allowed to execute.

For more information on Sudo and addition Sudo configuration options, see https://www.sudo.ws.

Rule   Ensure Users Re-Authenticate for Privilege Escalation - sudo !authenticate   [ref]

The sudo !authenticate option, when specified, allows a user to execute commands using sudo without having to authenticate. This should be disabled by making sure that the !authenticate option does not exist in /etc/sudoers configuration file or any sudo configuration snippets in /etc/sudoers.d/.

Rationale:

Without re-authentication, users may access resources or perform tasks for which they do not have authorization.

When operating systems provide the capability to escalate a functional capability, it is critical that the user re-authenticate.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80350-2

References:  RHEL-07-010350, SV-86573r3_rule, NT28(R5), NT28(R59), 1, 12, 15, 16, 5, DSS05.04, DSS05.10, DSS06.03, DSS06.10, CCI-002038, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, A.18.1.4, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.2, A.9.2.3, A.9.2.4, A.9.2.6, A.9.3.1, A.9.4.2, A.9.4.3, IA-11, PR.AC-1, PR.AC-7, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00156, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00157, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00158, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001470, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001480, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001490

Rule   Ensure Users Re-Authenticate for Privilege Escalation - sudo NOPASSWD   [ref]

The sudo NOPASSWD tag, when specified, allows a user to execute commands using sudo without having to authenticate. This should be disabled by making sure that the NOPASSWD tag does not exist in /etc/sudoers configuration file or any sudo configuration snippets in /etc/sudoers.d/.

Rationale:

Without re-authentication, users may access resources or perform tasks for which they do not have authorization.

When operating systems provide the capability to escalate a functional capability, it is critical that the user re-authenticate.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80351-0

References:  RHEL-07-010340, SV-86571r3_rule, NT28(R5), NT28(R59), 1, 12, 15, 16, 5, DSS05.04, DSS05.10, DSS06.03, DSS06.10, CCI-002038, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, A.18.1.4, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.2, A.9.2.3, A.9.2.4, A.9.2.6, A.9.3.1, A.9.4.2, A.9.4.3, IA-11, PR.AC-1, PR.AC-7, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00156, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00157, SRG-OS-000373-GPOS-00158, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001470, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001480, SRG-OS-000373-VMM-001490

Group   Updating Software   Group contains 5 rules

[ref]   The yum command line tool is used to install and update software packages. The system also provides a graphical software update tool in the System menu, in the Administration submenu, called Software Update.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 systems contain an installed software catalog called the RPM database, which records metadata of installed packages. Consistently using yum or the graphical Software Update for all software installation allows for insight into the current inventory of installed software on the system.

Rule   Ensure gpgcheck Enabled for All yum Package Repositories   [ref]

To ensure signature checking is not disabled for any repos, remove any lines from files in /etc/yum.repos.d of the form:

gpgcheck=0

Rationale:

Verifying the authenticity of the software prior to installation validates the integrity of the patch or upgrade received from a vendor. This ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor. Self-signed certificates are disallowed by this requirement. Certificates used to verify the software must be from an approved Certificate Authority (CA)."

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-26876-3

References:  NT28(R15), 11, 2, 3, 9, 5.10.4.1, APO01.06, BAI03.05, BAI06.01, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS06.02, 3.4.8, CCI-001749, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.312(b), 164.312(c)(1), 164.312(c)(2), 164.312(e)(2)(i), 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, 4.3.4.4.4, SR 3.1, SR 3.3, SR 3.4, SR 3.8, SR 7.6, A.11.2.4, A.12.1.2, A.12.2.1, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, CM-5(3), CM-11(a), SI-7, MA-1(b), PR.DS-6, PR.DS-8, PR.IP-1, FAU_GEN.1.1.c, Req-6.2, SRG-OS-000366-GPOS-00153, SRG-OS-000366-VMM-001430, SRG-OS-000370-VMM-001460, SRG-OS-000404-VMM-001650

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

sed -i 's/gpgcheck\s*=.*/gpgcheck=1/g' /etc/yum.repos.d/*
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:medium
- name: Find All yum Repositories
  find:
    paths: /etc/yum.repos.d/
    patterns: '*.repo'
    contains: ^\[.+]$
  register: yum_find
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_never_disabled
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26876-3
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Ensure gpgcheck Enabled For All yum Package Repositories
  with_items: '{{ yum_find.files }}'
  lineinfile:
    create: true
    dest: '{{ item.path }}'
    regexp: ^gpgcheck
    line: gpgcheck=1
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_never_disabled
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26876-3
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

Rule   Ensure Software Patches Installed   [ref]

If the system is joined to the Red Hat Network, a Red Hat Satellite Server, or a yum server, run the following command to install updates:

$ sudo yum update
If the system is not configured to use one of these sources, updates (in the form of RPM packages) can be manually downloaded from the Red Hat Network and installed using rpm.

NOTE: U.S. Defense systems are required to be patched within 30 days or sooner as local policy dictates.

Rationale:

Installing software updates is a fundamental mitigation against the exploitation of publicly-known vulnerabilities. If the most recent security patches and updates are not installed, unauthorized users may take advantage of weaknesses in the unpatched software. The lack of prompt attention to patching could result in a system compromise.

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-26895-3

References:  RHEL-07-020260, SV-86623r4_rule, NT28(R08), 1.8, 18, 20, 4, 5.10.4.1, APO12.01, APO12.02, APO12.03, APO12.04, BAI03.10, DSS05.01, DSS05.02, CCI-000366, 4.2.3, 4.2.3.12, 4.2.3.7, 4.2.3.9, A.12.6.1, A.14.2.3, A.16.1.3, A.18.2.2, A.18.2.3, SI-2, SI-2(c), MA-1(b), ID.RA-1, PR.IP-12, FMT_MOF_EXT.1, Req-6.2, SRG-OS-000480-GPOS-00227, SRG-OS-000480-VMM-002000

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:high
Reboot:true
Strategy:patch
yum -y update
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:high
Reboot:true
Strategy:patch
- name: Security patches are up to date
  package:
    name: '*'
    state: latest
  tags:
    - security_patches_up_to_date
    - high_severity
    - skip_ansible_lint
    - patch_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - high_disruption
    - reboot_required
    - CCE-26895-3
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020260
    - NIST-800-53-SI-2
    - NIST-800-53-SI-2(c)
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

Rule   Ensure Red Hat GPG Key Installed   [ref]

To ensure the system can cryptographically verify base software packages come from Red Hat (and to connect to the Red Hat Network to receive them), the Red Hat GPG key must properly be installed. To install the Red Hat GPG key, run:

$ sudo subscription-manager register
If the system is not connected to the Internet or an RHN Satellite, then install the Red Hat GPG key from trusted media such as the Red Hat installation CD-ROM or DVD. Assuming the disc is mounted in /media/cdrom, use the following command as the root user to import it into the keyring:
$ sudo rpm --import /media/cdrom/RPM-GPG-KEY
Alternatively, the key may be pre-loaded during the RHEL installation. In such cases, the key can be installed by running the following command:
sudo rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-key-redhat-release

Rationale:

Changes to software components can have significant effects on the overall security of the operating system. This requirement ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor. The Red Hat GPG key is necessary to cryptographically verify packages are from Red Hat.

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-26957-1

References:  NT28(R15), 1.2.3, 11, 2, 3, 9, 5.10.4.1, APO01.06, BAI03.05, BAI06.01, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS06.02, 3.4.8, CCI-001749, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.312(b), 164.312(c)(1), 164.312(c)(2), 164.312(e)(2)(i), 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, 4.3.4.4.4, SR 3.1, SR 3.3, SR 3.4, SR 3.8, SR 7.6, A.11.2.4, A.12.1.2, A.12.2.1, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, CM-5(3), CM-11(a), SI-7, MA-1(b), PR.DS-6, PR.DS-8, PR.IP-1, FAU_GEN.1.1.c, Req-6.2, SRG-OS-000366-GPOS-00153, SRG-OS-000366-VMM-001430, SRG-OS-000370-VMM-001460, SRG-OS-000404-VMM-001650

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

# The two fingerprints below are retrieved from https://access.redhat.com/security/team/key
readonly REDHAT_RELEASE_2_FINGERPRINT="567E347AD0044ADE55BA8A5F199E2F91FD431D51"
readonly REDHAT_AUXILIARY_FINGERPRINT="43A6E49C4A38F4BE9ABF2A5345689C882FA658E0"
# Location of the key we would like to import (once it's integrity verified)
readonly REDHAT_RELEASE_KEY="/etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-redhat-release"

RPM_GPG_DIR_PERMS=$(stat -c %a "$(dirname "$REDHAT_RELEASE_KEY")")

# Verify /etc/pki/rpm-gpg directory permissions are safe
if [ "${RPM_GPG_DIR_PERMS}" -le "755" ]
then
  # If they are safe, try to obtain fingerprints from the key file
  # (to ensure there won't be e.g. CRC error).

  readarray -t GPG_OUT < <(gpg --with-fingerprint --with-colons "$REDHAT_RELEASE_KEY" | grep "^fpr" | cut -d ":" -f 10)

  GPG_RESULT=$?
  # No CRC error, safe to proceed
  if [ "${GPG_RESULT}" -eq "0" ]
  then
    echo "${GPG_OUT[*]}" | grep -vE "${REDHAT_RELEASE_2_FINGERPRINT}|${REDHAT_AUXILIARY_FINGERPRINT}" || {
      # If $REDHAT_RELEASE_KEY file doesn't contain any keys with unknown fingerprint, import it
      rpm --import "${REDHAT_RELEASE_KEY}"
    }
  fi
fi
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:medium
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
- name: Read permission of GPG key directory
  stat:
    path: /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/
  register: gpg_key_directory_permission
  check_mode: false
  tags:
    - ensure_redhat_gpgkey_installed
    - high_severity
    - restrict_strategy
    - medium_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26957-1
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Read signatures in GPG key
  shell: |
    set -o pipefail
    gpg --with-fingerprint --with-colons "/etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-redhat-release" | grep "^fpr" | cut -d ":" -f 10
  args:
    warn: false
    executable: /bin/bash
  changed_when: false
  register: gpg_fingerprints
  check_mode: false
  tags:
    - ensure_redhat_gpgkey_installed
    - high_severity
    - restrict_strategy
    - medium_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26957-1
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Set Fact - Valid fingerprints
  set_fact:
    gpg_valid_fingerprints: ("567E347AD0044ADE55BA8A5F199E2F91FD431D51" "43A6E49C4A38F4BE9ABF2A5345689C882FA658E0")
  tags:
    - ensure_redhat_gpgkey_installed
    - high_severity
    - restrict_strategy
    - medium_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26957-1
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Import RedHat GPG key
  rpm_key:
    state: present
    key: /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-redhat-release
  when:
    - gpg_key_directory_permission.stat.mode <= '0755'
    - ( gpg_fingerprints.stdout_lines | difference(gpg_valid_fingerprints)) | length
      == 0
    - gpg_fingerprints.stdout_lines | length > 0
    - ansible_distribution == "RedHat"
  tags:
    - ensure_redhat_gpgkey_installed
    - high_severity
    - restrict_strategy
    - medium_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26957-1
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11(a)
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

Rule   Ensure gpgcheck Enabled In Main yum Configuration   [ref]

The gpgcheck option controls whether RPM packages' signatures are always checked prior to installation. To configure yum to check package signatures before installing them, ensure the following line appears in /etc/yum.conf in the [main] section:

gpgcheck=1

Rationale:

Changes to any software components can have significant effects on the overall security of the operating system. This requirement ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor.
Accordingly, patches, service packs, device drivers, or operating system components must be signed with a certificate recognized and approved by the organization.
Verifying the authenticity of the software prior to installation validates the integrity of the patch or upgrade received from a vendor. This ensures the software has not been tampered with and that it has been provided by a trusted vendor. Self-signed certificates are disallowed by this requirement. Certificates used to verify the software must be from an approved Certificate Authority (CA).

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-26989-4

References:  RHEL-07-020050, SV-86601r2_rule, NT28(R15), 1.2.2, 11, 2, 3, 9, 5.10.4.1, APO01.06, BAI03.05, BAI06.01, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, DSS06.02, 3.4.8, CCI-001749, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.312(b), 164.312(c)(1), 164.312(c)(2), 164.312(e)(2)(i), 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, 4.3.4.4.4, SR 3.1, SR 3.3, SR 3.4, SR 3.8, SR 7.6, A.11.2.4, A.12.1.2, A.12.2.1, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.1.2, A.14.1.3, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, CM-5(3), CM-11, SI-7, MA-1(b), PR.DS-6, PR.DS-8, PR.IP-1, FAU_GEN.1.1.c, Req-6.2, SRG-OS-000366-GPOS-00153, SRG-OS-000366-VMM-001430, SRG-OS-000370-VMM-001460, SRG-OS-000404-VMM-001650

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

# Function to replace configuration setting in config file or add the configuration setting if
# it does not exist.
#
# Expects arguments:
#
# config_file:		Configuration file that will be modified
# key:			Configuration option to change
# value:		Value of the configuration option to change
# cce:			The CCE identifier or '@CCENUM@' if no CCE identifier exists
# format:		The printf-like format string that will be given stripped key and value as arguments,
#			so e.g. '%s=%s' will result in key=value subsitution (i.e. without spaces around =)
#
# Optional arugments:
#
# format:		Optional argument to specify the format of how key/value should be
# 			modified/appended in the configuration file. The default is key = value.
#
# Example Call(s):
#
#     With default format of 'key = value':
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysctl.conf' '^kernel.randomize_va_space' '2' '@CCENUM@'
#
#     With custom key/value format:
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysconfig/selinux' '^SELINUX=' 'disabled' '@CCENUM@' '%s=%s'
#
#     With a variable:
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysconfig/selinux' '^SELINUX=' $var_selinux_state '@CCENUM@' '%s=%s'
#
function replace_or_append {
  local default_format='%s = %s' case_insensitive_mode=yes sed_case_insensitive_option='' grep_case_insensitive_option=''
  local config_file=$1
  local key=$2
  local value=$3
  local cce=$4
  local format=$5

  if [ "$case_insensitive_mode" = yes ]; then
    sed_case_insensitive_option="i"
    grep_case_insensitive_option="-i"
  fi
  [ -n "$format" ] || format="$default_format"
  # Check sanity of the input
  [ $# -ge "3" ] || { echo "Usage: replace_or_append <config_file_location> <key_to_search> <new_value> [<CCE number or literal '@CCENUM@' if unknown>] [printf-like format, default is '$default_format']" >&2; exit 1; }

  # Test if the config_file is a symbolic link. If so, use --follow-symlinks with sed.
  # Otherwise, regular sed command will do.
  sed_command=('sed' '-i')
  if test -L "$config_file"; then
    sed_command+=('--follow-symlinks')
  fi

  # Test that the cce arg is not empty or does not equal @CCENUM@.
  # If @CCENUM@ exists, it means that there is no CCE assigned.
  if [ -n "$cce" ] && [ "$cce" != '@CCENUM@' ]; then
    cce="${cce}"
  else
    cce="CCE"
  fi

  # Strip any search characters in the key arg so that the key can be replaced without
  # adding any search characters to the config file.
  stripped_key=$(sed 's/[\^=\$,;+]*//g' <<< "$key")

  # shellcheck disable=SC2059
  printf -v formatted_output "$format" "$stripped_key" "$value"

  # If the key exists, change it. Otherwise, add it to the config_file.
  # We search for the key string followed by a word boundary (matched by \>),
  # so if we search for 'setting', 'setting2' won't match.
  if LC_ALL=C grep -q -m 1 $grep_case_insensitive_option -e "${key}\\>" "$config_file"; then
    "${sed_command[@]}" "s/${key}\\>.*/$formatted_output/g$sed_case_insensitive_option" "$config_file"
  else
    # \n is precaution for case where file ends without trailing newline
    printf '\n# Per %s: Set %s in %s\n' "$cce" "$formatted_output" "$config_file" >> "$config_file"
    printf '%s\n' "$formatted_output" >> "$config_file"
  fi
}

replace_or_append "/etc/yum.conf" '^gpgcheck' '1' 'CCE-26989-4'
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:medium
- name: Check existence of yum on Fedora
  stat:
    path: /etc/yum.conf
  register: yum_config_file
  check_mode: false
  when: ansible_distribution == "Fedora"
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_globally_activated
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26989-4
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020050
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Ensure GPG check is globally activated (yum)
  ini_file:
    dest: /etc/yum.conf
    section: main
    option: gpgcheck
    value: 1
    create: false
  when: (ansible_distribution == "RedHat" or ansible_distribution == "CentOS" or yum_config_file.stat.exists)
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_globally_activated
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26989-4
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020050
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

- name: Ensure GPG check is globally activated (dnf)
  ini_file:
    dest: /etc/dnf/dnf.conf
    section: main
    option: gpgcheck
    value: 1
    create: false
  when: ansible_distribution == "Fedora"
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_globally_activated
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-26989-4
    - PCI-DSS-Req-6.2
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020050
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11
    - NIST-800-53-SI-7
    - NIST-800-53-MA-1(b)
    - CJIS-5.10.4.1

Rule   Ensure gpgcheck Enabled for Local Packages   [ref]

yum should be configured to verify the signature(s) of local packages prior to installation. To configure yum to verify signatures of local packages, set the localpkg_gpgcheck to 1 in /etc/yum.conf.

Rationale:

Changes to any software components can have significant effects to the overall security of the operating system. This requirement ensures the software has not been tampered and has been provided by a trusted vendor.

Accordingly, patches, service packs, device drivers, or operating system components must be signed with a certificate recognized and approved by the organization.

Severity: 
high
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80347-8

References:  RHEL-07-020060, SV-86603r2_rule, NT28(R15), 11, 3, 9, BAI10.01, BAI10.02, BAI10.03, BAI10.05, 3.4.8, CCI-001749, 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D), 164.312(b), 164.312(c)(1), 164.312(c)(2), 164.312(e)(2)(i), 4.3.4.3.2, 4.3.4.3.3, SR 7.6, A.12.1.2, A.12.5.1, A.12.6.2, A.14.2.2, A.14.2.3, A.14.2.4, CM-5(3), CM-11, PR.IP-1, FAU_GEN.1.1.c, SRG-OS-000366-GPOS-00153, SRG-OS-000366-VMM-001430, SRG-OS-000370-VMM-001460, SRG-OS-000404-VMM-001650

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

# Function to replace configuration setting in config file or add the configuration setting if
# it does not exist.
#
# Expects arguments:
#
# config_file:		Configuration file that will be modified
# key:			Configuration option to change
# value:		Value of the configuration option to change
# cce:			The CCE identifier or '@CCENUM@' if no CCE identifier exists
# format:		The printf-like format string that will be given stripped key and value as arguments,
#			so e.g. '%s=%s' will result in key=value subsitution (i.e. without spaces around =)
#
# Optional arugments:
#
# format:		Optional argument to specify the format of how key/value should be
# 			modified/appended in the configuration file. The default is key = value.
#
# Example Call(s):
#
#     With default format of 'key = value':
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysctl.conf' '^kernel.randomize_va_space' '2' '@CCENUM@'
#
#     With custom key/value format:
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysconfig/selinux' '^SELINUX=' 'disabled' '@CCENUM@' '%s=%s'
#
#     With a variable:
#     replace_or_append '/etc/sysconfig/selinux' '^SELINUX=' $var_selinux_state '@CCENUM@' '%s=%s'
#
function replace_or_append {
  local default_format='%s = %s' case_insensitive_mode=yes sed_case_insensitive_option='' grep_case_insensitive_option=''
  local config_file=$1
  local key=$2
  local value=$3
  local cce=$4
  local format=$5

  if [ "$case_insensitive_mode" = yes ]; then
    sed_case_insensitive_option="i"
    grep_case_insensitive_option="-i"
  fi
  [ -n "$format" ] || format="$default_format"
  # Check sanity of the input
  [ $# -ge "3" ] || { echo "Usage: replace_or_append <config_file_location> <key_to_search> <new_value> [<CCE number or literal '@CCENUM@' if unknown>] [printf-like format, default is '$default_format']" >&2; exit 1; }

  # Test if the config_file is a symbolic link. If so, use --follow-symlinks with sed.
  # Otherwise, regular sed command will do.
  sed_command=('sed' '-i')
  if test -L "$config_file"; then
    sed_command+=('--follow-symlinks')
  fi

  # Test that the cce arg is not empty or does not equal @CCENUM@.
  # If @CCENUM@ exists, it means that there is no CCE assigned.
  if [ -n "$cce" ] && [ "$cce" != '@CCENUM@' ]; then
    cce="${cce}"
  else
    cce="CCE"
  fi

  # Strip any search characters in the key arg so that the key can be replaced without
  # adding any search characters to the config file.
  stripped_key=$(sed 's/[\^=\$,;+]*//g' <<< "$key")

  # shellcheck disable=SC2059
  printf -v formatted_output "$format" "$stripped_key" "$value"

  # If the key exists, change it. Otherwise, add it to the config_file.
  # We search for the key string followed by a word boundary (matched by \>),
  # so if we search for 'setting', 'setting2' won't match.
  if LC_ALL=C grep -q -m 1 $grep_case_insensitive_option -e "${key}\\>" "$config_file"; then
    "${sed_command[@]}" "s/${key}\\>.*/$formatted_output/g$sed_case_insensitive_option" "$config_file"
  else
    # \n is precaution for case where file ends without trailing newline
    printf '\n# Per %s: Set %s in %s\n' "$cce" "$formatted_output" "$config_file" >> "$config_file"
    printf '%s\n' "$formatted_output" >> "$config_file"
  fi
}

replace_or_append '/etc/yum.conf' '^localpkg_gpgcheck' '1' 'CCE-80347-8'
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:medium
- name: Check existence of yum on Fedora
  stat:
    path: /etc/yum.conf
  register: yum_config_file
  check_mode: false
  when: ansible_distribution == "Fedora"
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_local_packages
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80347-8
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020060
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11

- name: Ensure GPG check Enabled for Local Packages (Yum)
  ini_file:
    dest: /etc/yum.conf
    section: main
    option: localpkg_gpgcheck
    value: 1
    create: true
  when: (ansible_distribution == "RedHat" or ansible_distribution == "CentOS" or yum_config_file.stat.exists)
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_local_packages
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80347-8
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020060
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11

- name: Ensure GPG check Enabled for Local Packages (DNF)
  ini_file:
    dest: /etc/dnf/dnf.conf
    section: main
    option: localpkg_gpgcheck
    value: 1
    create: true
  when: ansible_distribution == "Fedora"
  tags:
    - ensure_gpgcheck_local_packages
    - high_severity
    - unknown_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - medium_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80347-8
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-020060
    - NIST-800-171-3.4.8
    - NIST-800-53-CM-5(3)
    - NIST-800-53-CM-11
Group   Configure Syslog   Group contains 2 rules

[ref]   The syslog service has been the default Unix logging mechanism for many years. It has a number of downsides, including inconsistent log format, lack of authentication for received messages, and lack of authentication, encryption, or reliable transport for messages sent over a network. However, due to its long history, syslog is a de facto standard which is supported by almost all Unix applications.

In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, rsyslog has replaced ksyslogd as the syslog daemon of choice, and it includes some additional security features such as reliable, connection-oriented (i.e. TCP) transmission of logs, the option to log to database formats, and the encryption of log data en route to a central logging server. This section discusses how to configure rsyslog for best effect, and how to use tools provided with the system to maintain and monitor logs.

Rule   Enable rsyslog Service   [ref]

The rsyslog service provides syslog-style logging by default on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. The rsyslog service can be enabled with the following command:

$ sudo systemctl enable rsyslog.service

Rationale:

The rsyslog service must be running in order to provide logging services, which are essential to system administration.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80188-6

References:  NT28(R5), NT28(R46), 4.2.1.1, 1, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, APO10.01, APO10.03, APO10.04, APO10.05, APO11.04, APO13.01, BAI03.05, BAI04.04, DSS01.03, DSS03.05, DSS05.02, DSS05.04, DSS05.05, DSS05.07, MEA01.01, MEA01.02, MEA01.03, MEA01.04, MEA01.05, MEA02.01, CCI-001311, CCI-001312, CCI-001557, CCI-001851, 164.312(a)(2)(ii), 4.3.2.6.7, 4.3.3.3.9, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.4.4.7, 4.4.2.1, 4.4.2.2, 4.4.2.4, SR 2.10, SR 2.11, SR 2.12, SR 2.8, SR 2.9, SR 6.1, SR 6.2, SR 7.1, SR 7.2, A.12.1.3, A.12.4.1, A.12.4.2, A.12.4.3, A.12.4.4, A.12.7.1, A.14.2.7, A.15.2.1, A.15.2.2, A.17.2.1, AU-4(1), AU-12, DE.CM-1, DE.CM-3, DE.CM-7, ID.SC-4, PR.DS-4, PR.PT-1

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable

SYSTEMCTL_EXEC='/usr/bin/systemctl'
"$SYSTEMCTL_EXEC" start 'rsyslog.service'
"$SYSTEMCTL_EXEC" enable 'rsyslog.service'
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable
- name: Enable service rsyslog
  service:
    name: rsyslog
    enabled: 'yes'
    state: started
  when: ansible_virtualization_role != "guest" or ansible_virtualization_type != "docker"
  tags:
    - service_rsyslog_enabled
    - medium_severity
    - enable_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - low_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80188-6
    - NIST-800-53-AU-4(1)
    - NIST-800-53-AU-12

Rule   Ensure rsyslog is Installed   [ref]

Rsyslog is installed by default. The rsyslog package can be installed with the following command:

 $ sudo yum install rsyslog

Rationale:

The rsyslog package provides the rsyslog daemon, which provides system logging services.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-80187-8

References:  NT28(R5), NT28(R46), 4.2.3, 1, 14, 15, 16, 3, 5, 6, APO11.04, BAI03.05, DSS05.04, DSS05.07, MEA02.01, CCI-001311, CCI-001312, 164.312(a)(2)(ii), 4.3.3.3.9, 4.3.3.5.8, 4.3.4.4.7, 4.4.2.1, 4.4.2.2, 4.4.2.4, SR 2.10, SR 2.11, SR 2.12, SR 2.8, SR 2.9, A.12.4.1, A.12.4.2, A.12.4.3, A.12.4.4, A.12.7.1, AU-9(2), PR.PT-1

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable
# Function to install packages on RHEL, Fedora, Debian, and possibly other systems.
#
# Example Call(s):
#
#     package_install aide
#
function package_install {

# Load function arguments into local variables
local package="$1"

# Check sanity of the input
if [ $# -ne "1" ]
then
  echo "Usage: package_install 'package_name'"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

if which dnf ; then
  if ! rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    dnf install -y "$package"
  fi
elif which yum ; then
  if ! rpm -q --quiet "$package"; then
    yum install -y "$package"
  fi
elif which apt-get ; then
  apt-get install -y "$package"
else
  echo "Failed to detect available packaging system, tried dnf, yum and apt-get!"
  echo "Aborting."
  exit 1
fi

}

package_install rsyslog
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable
- name: Ensure rsyslog is installed
  package:
    name: rsyslog
    state: present
  when: ansible_virtualization_role != "guest" or ansible_virtualization_type != "docker"
  tags:
    - package_rsyslog_installed
    - medium_severity
    - enable_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - low_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-80187-8
    - NIST-800-53-AU-9(2)
Remediation Puppet snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable
include install_rsyslog

class install_rsyslog {
  package { 'rsyslog':
    ensure => 'installed',
  }
}
Remediation Anaconda snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:enable

package --add=rsyslog
Group   Account and Access Control   Group contains 2 groups and 1 rule

[ref]   In traditional Unix security, if an attacker gains shell access to a certain login account, they can perform any action or access any file to which that account has access. Therefore, making it more difficult for unauthorized people to gain shell access to accounts, particularly to privileged accounts, is a necessary part of securing a system. This section introduces mechanisms for restricting access to accounts under Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

Group   Protect Accounts by Configuring PAM   Group contains 1 group and 1 rule

[ref]   PAM, or Pluggable Authentication Modules, is a system which implements modular authentication for Linux programs. PAM provides a flexible and configurable architecture for authentication, and it should be configured to minimize exposure to unnecessary risk. This section contains guidance on how to accomplish that.

PAM is implemented as a set of shared objects which are loaded and invoked whenever an application wishes to authenticate a user. Typically, the application must be running as root in order to take advantage of PAM, because PAM's modules often need to be able to access sensitive stores of account information, such as /etc/shadow. Traditional privileged network listeners (e.g. sshd) or SUID programs (e.g. sudo) already meet this requirement. An SUID root application, userhelper, is provided so that programs which are not SUID or privileged themselves can still take advantage of PAM.

PAM looks in the directory /etc/pam.d for application-specific configuration information. For instance, if the program login attempts to authenticate a user, then PAM's libraries follow the instructions in the file /etc/pam.d/login to determine what actions should be taken.

One very important file in /etc/pam.d is /etc/pam.d/system-auth. This file, which is included by many other PAM configuration files, defines 'default' system authentication measures. Modifying this file is a good way to make far-reaching authentication changes, for instance when implementing a centralized authentication service.

Warning:  Be careful when making changes to PAM's configuration files. The syntax for these files is complex, and modifications can have unexpected consequences. The default configurations shipped with applications should be sufficient for most users.
Warning:  Running authconfig or system-config-authentication will re-write the PAM configuration files, destroying any manually made changes and replacing them with a series of system defaults. One reference to the configuration file syntax can be found at http://www.linux-pam.org/Linux-PAM-html/sag-configuration-file.html.
Group   Set Password Hashing Algorithm   Group contains 1 rule

[ref]   The system's default algorithm for storing password hashes in /etc/shadow is SHA-512. This can be configured in several locations.

Rule   Set Password Hashing Algorithm in /etc/login.defs   [ref]

In /etc/login.defs, add or correct the following line to ensure the system will use SHA-512 as the hashing algorithm:

ENCRYPT_METHOD SHA512

Rationale:

Passwords need to be protected at all times, and encryption is the standard method for protecting passwords. If passwords are not encrypted, they can be plainly read (i.e., clear text) and easily compromised. Passwords that are encrypted with a weak algorithm are no more protected than if they are kept in plain text.

Using a stronger hashing algorithm makes password cracking attacks more difficult.

Severity: 
medium
Identifiers and References

Identifiers:  CCE-82050-6

References:  RHEL-07-010210, SV-86545r2_rule, NT28(R32), 6.3.1, 1, 12, 15, 16, 5, 5.6.2.2, DSS05.04, DSS05.05, DSS05.07, DSS05.10, DSS06.03, DSS06.10, 3.13.11, CCI-000196, 4.3.3.2.2, 4.3.3.5.1, 4.3.3.5.2, 4.3.3.6.1, 4.3.3.6.2, 4.3.3.6.3, 4.3.3.6.4, 4.3.3.6.5, 4.3.3.6.6, 4.3.3.6.7, 4.3.3.6.8, 4.3.3.6.9, 4.3.3.7.2, 4.3.3.7.4, SR 1.1, SR 1.10, SR 1.2, SR 1.3, SR 1.4, SR 1.5, SR 1.7, SR 1.8, SR 1.9, SR 2.1, A.18.1.4, A.7.1.1, A.9.2.1, A.9.2.2, A.9.2.3, A.9.2.4, A.9.2.6, A.9.3.1, A.9.4.2, A.9.4.3, IA-5(b), IA-5(c), IA-5(1)(c), IA-7, PR.AC-1, PR.AC-6, PR.AC-7, Req-8.2.1, SRG-OS-000073-GPOS-00041

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

if grep --silent ^ENCRYPT_METHOD /etc/login.defs ; then
	sed -i 's/^ENCRYPT_METHOD.*/ENCRYPT_METHOD SHA512/g' /etc/login.defs
else
	echo "" >> /etc/login.defs
	echo "ENCRYPT_METHOD SHA512" >> /etc/login.defs
fi
Remediation Ansible snippet:   (show)

Complexity:low
Disruption:low
Strategy:restrict
- name: Set Password Hashing Algorithm in /etc/login.defs
  lineinfile:
    dest: /etc/login.defs
    regexp: ^#?ENCRYPT_METHOD
    line: ENCRYPT_METHOD SHA512
    state: present
  tags:
    - set_password_hashing_algorithm_logindefs
    - medium_severity
    - restrict_strategy
    - low_complexity
    - low_disruption
    - no_reboot_needed
    - CCE-82050-6
    - PCI-DSS-Req-8.2.1
    - DISA-STIG-RHEL-07-010210
    - NIST-800-171-3.13.11
    - NIST-800-53-IA-5(b)
    - NIST-800-53-IA-5(c)
    - NIST-800-53-IA-5(1)(c)
    - NIST-800-53-IA-7
    - CJIS-5.6.2.2
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