Guide to the Secure Configuration of Java Runtime Environment

with profile Java Runtime Environment (JRE) STIG
The Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is a bundle developed and offered by Oracle Corporation which includes the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), class libraries, and other components necessary to run Java applications and applets. Certain default settings within the JRE pose a security risk so it is necessary to deploy system wide properties to ensure a higher degree of security when utilizing the JRE. The IBM Corporation also develops and bundles the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) as well as Red Hat with OpenJDK.

This guide presents a catalog of security-relevant configuration settings for Java Runtime Environment. It is a rendering of content structured in the eXtensible Configuration Checklist Description Format (XCCDF) in order to support security automation. The SCAP content is is available in the scap-security-guide package which is developed at https://www.open-scap.org/security-policies/scap-security-guide.

Providing system administrators with such guidance informs them how to securely configure systems under their control in a variety of network roles. Policy makers and baseline creators can use this catalog of settings, with its associated references to higher-level security control catalogs, in order to assist them in security baseline creation. This guide is a catalog, not a checklist, and satisfaction of every item is not likely to be possible or sensible in many operational scenarios. However, the XCCDF format enables granular selection and adjustment of settings, and their association with OVAL and OCIL content provides an automated checking capability. Transformations of this document, and its associated automated checking content, are capable of providing baselines that meet a diverse set of policy objectives. Some example XCCDF Profiles, which are selections of items that form checklists and can be used as baselines, are available with this guide. They can be processed, in an automated fashion, with tools that support the Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP). The DISA STIG for Java Runtime Environment, which provides required settings for US Department of Defense systems, is one example of a baseline created from this guidance.
Do not attempt to implement any of the settings in this guide without first testing them in a non-operational environment. The creators of this guidance assume no responsibility whatsoever for its use by other parties, and makes no guarantees, expressed or implied, about its quality, reliability, or any other characteristic.
Profile TitleJava Runtime Environment (JRE) STIG
Profile IDxccdf_org.ssgproject.content_profile_stig-java-upstream

Revision History

Current version: 0.1.31

  • draft (as of 2017-03-21)

Platforms

  • cpe:/a:oracle:jre:
  • cpe:/a:sun:jre:
  • cpe:/a:redhat:openjdk:
  • cpe:/a:ibm:jre:

Table of Contents

  1. Java
    1. Configure the deployment.config File

Checklist

contains 11 rules

Java   [ref]group

Java is a general-purpose computer programming language. It is intended to let application developers "write once, run anywhere." Java applications are typically compiled to bytecode that can run on any Java virtual machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. As such, the Java runtime environment (JRE) is required to be installed so that Java applications can run. This section provides settings for configuring Java policies to meet compliance settings for Java running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems.

contains 11 rules

Configure the deployment.config File   [ref]group

The deployment.config file if used for specifying the System-level deployment.properties file. The System-level configuration for Java is configured in /etc/.java/deployment. By default, no deployment.config file exists. To ensure that the Java /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config file is configured correctly, deployment.system.config and deployment.system.config.mandatory need to be set correctly.

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

contains 3 rules

The Java Configuration File Exists   [ref]rule

If the Java configuration file does not exist, it can be added by running:

$ sudo mkdir -p -m 755 /etc/.java/deployment
$ sudo touch /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config
$ sudo chmod 644 /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config

Rationale:

The deployment.config file is used for specifying the location and execution of system-level properties for the Java Runtime Environment. By default no deployment.config file exists; thus, no system-wide deployment.properties file exists. Without the deployment.config file, setting particular options for the Java control panel is impossible.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0070-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_CONFIG="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config"
JAVA_DIR="/etc/.java/deployment"

if [ ! -d ${JAVA_DIR} ] ; then
  mkdir -p -m 755 ${JAVA_DIR}
fi

if [ ! -e ${JAVA_CONFIG} ]; then
  touch ${JAVA_CONFIG} && chmod 644 ${JAVA_CONFIG}
fi

chmod 644 ${JAVA_CONFIG}

Configure the deployment.properties File Path   [ref]rule

To ensure that the Java properties file is set in /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config, add or modify deployment.system.config to equal file:///etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Without a proper path for the properties file, deployment would not be possible. If the path specified does not lead to a properties file, the value of the 'deployment.system.config.mandatory' key determines how to handle the situation. If the value of this key is true, JRE will not run if the path to the properties file is invalid.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0060-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_CONFIG="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config"
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.system.config=file://${JAVA_CONFIG}$" ${JAVA_CONFIG} && \
sed -i "s;deployment.system.config=.*;deployment.system.config=file:\/\/${JAVA_PROPERTIES};g" ${JAVA_CONFIG}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.system.config=file://${JAVA_PROPERTIES}" >> ${JAVA_CONFIG}
fi

Configure The Java Deployment Mandatory Setting   [ref]rule

To configure the Java mandatory deployment setting, add or modify deployment.system.config.mandatory to equal false in /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config.

Rationale:

Without a proper path for the properties file, deployment would not be possible. If the path specified does not lead to a properties file, the value of the 'deployment.system.config.mandatory' key determines how to handle the situation. If the value of this key is true, JRE will not run if the path to the properties file is invalid.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0060-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_CONFIG="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.config"

grep -q "^deployment.system.config.mandatory=false$" ${JAVA_CONFIG} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.system.config.mandatory=.*/deployment.system.config.mandatory=false/g" ${JAVA_CONFIG}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.system.config.mandatory=false" >> ${JAVA_CONFIG}
fi

The Java Properties File Exists   [ref]rule

If the Java properties file does not exist, it can be added by running:

$ sudo mkdir -p -m 755 /etc/.java/deployment
$ sudo touch /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties
$ sudo chmod 644 /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties

Rationale:

Each option in the Java control panel is represented by property keys. These keys adjust the options in the Java control panel based on the value assigned to that key. By default no deployment.properties file exists; thus, no system-wide exists. Without the deployment.properties file, setting particular options for the Java control panel is impossible.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0080-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"
JAVA_DIR="/etc/.java/deployment"

if [ ! -d ${JAVA_DIR} ] ; then
  mkdir -p -m 755 ${JAVA_DIR}
fi

if [ ! -e ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} ]; then
  touch ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && chmod 644 ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

chmod 644 ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}

Disable Java Execution From Untrusted Sources   [ref]rule

To ensure that Java cannot execute from untrusted sources, set deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca to equal false in /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Permitting execution of signed Java applets from un-trusted sources may result in acquiring malware, and risks system modification, invasion of privacy, or denial of service.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0001-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca=false$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca=.*/deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca=false/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca=false" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Disable User Access to Untrusted Sources Settings   [ref]rule

To ensure that users cannot change the untrusted sources settings, add deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca.locked to /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Permitting execution of signed Java applets from un-trusted sources may result in malware running on the system, and risks system modification, invasion of privacy, or denial of service. As such, ensuring users cannot change the permission settings which control the execution of signed Java applets contributes to a more consistent security profile.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0010-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca.locked$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca\..*/deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca.locked/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.askgrantdialog.notinca.locked" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Enable Revocation Checks for Publisher Certificates   [ref]rule

To ensure that certificate revocation checks are enabled, set deployment.security.validation.crl to equal true in /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Certificates may be revoked due to improper issuance, compromise of the certificate, and failure to adhere to policy. Therefore, any certificate found on a CRL should not be trusted. Permitting execution of an applet published with a revoked certificate may result in spoofing, malware, system modification, invasion of privacy, and denial of service.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0020-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.validation.crl=true$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.validation.crl=.*/deployment.security.validation.crl=true/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.validation.crl=true" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Disable User Access to Revocation Check Settings   [ref]rule

To ensure that users cannot change certificate revocation check settings, add deployment.security.validation.crl.locked to /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Permitting execution of an applet published with a revoked certificate may result in spoofing, malware, system modification, invasion of privacy, and denial of service. As such, ensuring users cannot change settings contributes to a more consistent security profile.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0030-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.validation.crl.locked$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.validation.crl\..*/deployment.security.validation.crl.locked/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.validation.crl.locked" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Enable Online Certificate Validation   [ref]rule

To ensure that online certificate verification is enabled, set deployment.security.validation.ocsp to equal true in /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Online certificate validation provides a greater degree of validation of certificates when running a signed Java applet. Permitting execution of an applet with an invalid certificate may result in malware execution , system modification, invasion of privacy, and denial of service.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0040-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.validation.ocsp=true$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.validation.ocsp=.*/deployment.security.validation.ocsp=true/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.validation.ocsp=true" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Disable User Access to Online Certificate Validation Settings   [ref]rule

To ensure that users cannot change the online certificate verification settings, add deployment.security.validation.ocsp.locked to /etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties.

Rationale:

Online certificate validation provides a greater degree of validation of certificates when running a signed Java applet. Permitting execution of an applet with an invalid certificate may result in malware execution , system modification, invasion of privacy, and denial of service. As such, ensuring users cannot change settings contributes to a more consistent security profile.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0050-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Remediation Shell script:   (show)

Complexity:high
Disruption:medium
Strategy:restrict
JAVA_PROPERTIES="/etc/.java/deployment/deployment.properties"

grep -q "^deployment.security.validation.ocsp.locked$" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES} && \
sed -i "s/deployment.security.validation.ocsp\..*/deployment.security.validation.ocsp.locked/g" ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
if ! [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "deployment.security.validation.ocsp.locked" >> ${JAVA_PROPERTIES}
fi

Ensure Java Patches Installed   [ref]rule

If the system is joined to the Red Hat Network, a Red Hat Satellite Server, or a yum server, run the following command to install updates:

$ sudo yum update
If the system is not configured to use one of these sources, updates (in the form of RPM packages) can be manually downloaded and installed using rpm.

Rationale:

Running an older version of the JRE can introduce security vulnerabilities to the system.

identifiers:  CCE-, JRE0090-UX

references:  DCBP-1, http://iase.disa.mil/stigs/cci/Pages/index.aspx

Red Hat and Red Hat Enterprise Linux are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Red Hat, Inc. in the United States and other countries. All other names are registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective companies.